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Eagan, Minnesota, Legal Blog

What mistakes should you avoid during your divorce?

At its core, divorce is often painful at best. Not only do you need to come to grips with the fact that your marriage is over, but also decide how you will part ways as you move forward on your own.

But as you consider the past, you must also look to the future. Although you might wonder what your life will be like moving forward, you probably hope you can get through your divorce process relatively unscathed. In many cases, it could be helpful to remain aware of some potential mistakes you should try not to make.

Consider your city's zoning laws before your start your business

As a business owner, you probably want to do everything possible to grow your company. You have researched the market and your business plan is set.

While choosing a business location, you want your doors to be accessible, and you likely thought about how easily your customers and vendors could notice your signage. But how thoroughly have you considered the zoning laws of your community?

Why would you choose someone else to raise your children?

As parents, you do the best you can for your children. You give them the best education possible, offer a wide range of enrichment activities, and provide travel opportunities that expand your children’s minds.

Although you do everything within your power to give your children a wonderful life, it is also important to consider what would happen if the unexpected were to occur. Since you are young and healthy, perhaps you have not given estate planning much thought. But now that you have children, it would be beneficial to plan for all possibilities.

Prenups in Minnesota must be signed without undue pressure

Love does not always last forever, and unless you hire a savvy lawyer, your prenuptial agreement might not last either.

A prenuptial agreement – commonly known as a prenup and in Minnesota legalese known as an antenuptial agreement – is drawn up between a couple before their marriage to determine the disposition of assets that are both brought into the marriage and, in some cases, assets that accrue during a marriage.

Is it time to modify your custody orders?

Life may throw many circumstantial changes at you, maybe when you least expect it. You and your co-parent may have walked away from the divorce court with an agreeable set of child custody and parenting time orders, but might now find that the terms no longer suit your current parenting needs. If you are struggling to keep up with your original co-parenting plan, it may be time to modify your custody orders in court.

Before you proceed with the decision, keep in mind that a court will only modify custody orders based on the bests interests of your child. Consider whether your motivations for requesting a modification align with some of the most common reasons that qualify:

Coping with your divorce

No one gets married with the hope of one day getting divorced. Yet, many marriages may come to an end for one reason or another. Regardless of the cause, filing for divorce is a major life decision that may come with significant emotional stress. Although it may not seem like you have the strength to get over such a difficult event at the moment, there are a few helpful tips you can keep in mind to cope with the pain:

What happens to the house during divorce?

When you and your spouse have lived together for a long time, going through a divorce can be especially challenging. Among the many issues that come with separation, you may be particularly concerned with who will get to keep your house.

If you and your spouse are worried about the post-marital fate of your home, there may be a range of approaches for you to take. The two most common options include:

Can you settle divorce issues with early neutral evaluation?

Things can get contentious during a divorce. You and your former spouse are trying to agree about how to divide property, money and often, time with children. These issues are deeply personal, and in a situation where tensions are running high, matters can escalate quickly.

If you and your soon-to-be ex are about to head to court, you may want to consider a type of alternative dispute resolution known as early neutral evaluation. It could save you time, money and heartache.

How to deal with a spouse hiding assets during a divorce

A recent criminal case involving a University of Minnesota professor shows how far some people will go to deceive their exes during a divorce. According to The Star Tribune, a jury found the professor guilty of one count of attempted theft by swindle and two counts of aggravated forgery.

The criminal case alleged that he forged financial documents from one of his retirement accounts and left out critical information on another retirement account statement. In doing so, the professor grossly misrepresented his assets to hide money. This deception could have resulted in a loss of $353,649 for his former wife during the divorce.

How to talk to adult children about gray divorce

Many couples have begun to divorce well into their 50s and 60s. There are many differences with these kinds of divorces compared to other ones, including the fact that the couple will most likely have adult children who no longer live at home but are nonetheless unhappy to hear their parents want to separate.

Couples with adult children need to remember that they are always parents. That means they need to put the emotional well-being of their children over their own self-interests. Divorcing at a later age may be necessary, but you still want to ensure your children are all right during this time. Here are some tips on how to talk with them about this process:

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